John Sutherland (-1508), 8. Earl of Sutherland

Same as
Additional names
Parents
Father:1John Sutherland (-1460), 7. Earl of Sutherland
Mother:2Margaret Baillie (-1509 or 1510)
Spouses and relationship events
Married:3(Unknown) Macdonald (-)
Sir Robert Gordon says John, 8. Earl of Sutherland, married a daughter of Alexander Macdonald, Lord of the Isles, though no proof is forthcoming. Sir Robert adds that this lady was nearly drowned while crossing the ferry at Unes, and was found in a state of weakness and slain by a robber. She must have been his first wife.
Married:4Fingole (-)
In February 1497-98 there were preparations for a divorce between Fingole and the Earl of Sutherland, which the Lords of Council referred to the Vicar-General of Caithness.
Married:5before 1508Catherine (-)
Children
Children with (Unknown) Macdonald:
Elizabeth Sutherland (-September 1535), Countess of Sutherland6
John Sutherland (-1514), 9. Earl of Sutherland7
Children with Fingole:
Alexander Sutherland (1491-1519 or 1520)8
Attributes
Occupation:98. Earl of Sutherland
Events
Died:101508
Personal Info
He was the second, but eldest surviving, son of the seventh Earl of Sutherland, and is first mentioned in the resignation made in his favour by his father on 22 February 1455-56. Pursuant to this John Sutherland was secured in the earldom by the usual forms, under reservation of the liferent of certain lands to his father and mother. The life of this Earl was not very eventful. His record consists chiefly of charters received and charters granted by bim, while be was also frequently involved in litigation. Sir Robert Gordon charges the Earl with unkindness to his mother, and with ruthless cruelty towards some of his own relatives, but he says nothing about the probable cause of these and other shortcomings, namely the Earl's mental weakness. A brieve of idiotry was issued by King James IV in 1494, and after the usual proceedings the Earl was, by a jury, declared incapable of managing bis own affairs, and he was placed under the care of a tutor. Sir James Dunbar of Cumnock. The latter was directed by the Lords of Council on 9 February 1497-98 to convoy the Earl and his son to the presence of King James IV, where they were to be delivered to the King, doubtless as the legal custodier of the Earl in his unfortunate condition, and of his son the heir. Sir James was to provide the expenses of the journey, and the Earl and his son were to be brought in freedom honourably to the King 'that he may consider and provide bow they may be rulit according to their estate offering to their living.' About the same time Alexander Sutherland of Dirlot bad spoiled 'Dunrobin,' carrying off a quantity of household furniture and grain, which he and his accomplices were ordered to pay to Sir James Dunbar,the Earl's curator. But although the Earl's affairs were administered by a curator he seems to have been held responsible for his actions. On 15 November 1501, decision was given in two actions raised against him for spoliation. In the first of these Kinnaird of Skelbo complained against the Earl for spoliation and withholding the rents of the lands of Doll and Terrell. The defence was that they were the Earl's own heritage, and be was assigned a date on which to produce writs before the Justice Air at Elgin.' In the second case the complainers were bis own sister Janet, widow of Alexander Dunbar of Kilcolmkill, and James Dunbar her son, who charged the Earl with taking up the rents of Kilcolmkill due to her as terce and to her son. All parties were present in Court when the case was decided, and the Earl was ordained to .cease his spoliation and to pay the rents to the proper parties. This is the last appearance of him on record, and he is said to have died in 1508.11
Issues

Sources

1 ´╗┐Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume VIII: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1911), Sutherland, p. 330-32, VII John.
2 Ibid
3 Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume VIII: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1911), Sutherland, p. 332-35, VIII John.
4 Ibid
5 Ibid
6 Ibid
7 Ibid
8 Ibid
9 Ibid
10 Ibid
11 Ibid
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