John Sutherland (-1460), 7. Earl of Sutherland

Same as
Additional names
Parents
Father:1Robert of Sutherland (-1442), 6. Earl of Sutherland
Mother:2Margaret Stewart (-)
Spouses and relationship events
Married:3Margaret Baillie (-1509 or 1510)
Children
Children with Margaret Baillie:
John Sutherland (-1508), 8. Earl of Sutherland4
Alexander Sutherland (-before February 1455-56), Master of Sutherland5
Nicolas Sutherland (-)6
Thomas 'Beg' Sutherland (-)7
Robert Sutherland (-)8
Janet Sutherland (-1511 or 1512)9
Children with :
Thomas 'Mor' Sutherland (-)10
Attributes
Occupation:117. Earl of Sutherland
Events
Died:121460
This Earl is said by Sir Robert Gordon to have died in 1460, and to have been buried in the chapel of St. Andrew at Golspie.
Personal Info
He is is first named as taking part, as one of the retinue of his uncle Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, in the latter's campaign in Flanders about 1408. Wyntoun, a contemporary, tells how the Earl, before an expected battle, knighted some of his esquires, one of these being John of Sutherland 'his newew, a lord apperand of vertew, Heretabil Erl of that countre.' The young knight fought bravely, and the cause the Earl favoured was victorious. Nothing further is recorded of him until 1427, when it was probably he who went to England as one of the hostages for King James I. He remained in England for many years, being confined in Pontefract Castle, where there were many other Scots hostages. While there, on 12 July 1444, he granted to his kinsman, Alexander Sutherland of Duffus, a charter confirming the lands of Torboll. On 3 February 1444-45 a safe-conduct was issued to Margaret Sutherland, Alexander and Robert Sutherland, probably the Earl's wife and children, for a year, to pass between England and Scotland. He must have been liberated not very long after, as he was at Dunrobin Castle in May 1448, when he presented a chaplain to the chapel of St. Andrew at Golspie. On 29 April 1451 he and his wife Margaret received a crown charter of Crakaig, Easter and Wester Loth, and other lands in the parish of Loth. These lands were reserved for liferent use to himself and his Countess when he resigned his earldom into the hands of King James II in favour of his son John, who was infeft in the lands in his father's lifetime.13
Issues

Sources

1 ´╗┐Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume VIII: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1911), Sutherland, p. 329-30, VI Robert.
2 Ibid
3 Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume VIII: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1911), Sutherland, p. 330-32, VII John.
4 Ibid
5 Ibid
6 Ibid
7 Ibid
8 Ibid
9 Ibid
10 Ibid
11 Ibid
12 Ibid
13 Ibid
CertainlyThe information is supported by primary sources.
ProbablyThe information is supported by secondary sources which is most likely based on primary sources.
PossiblyIt is unclear if the secondary source cited is based on primary sources, or the information is an assumption well supported by other evidence.
LikelyThe information is only found in secondary sources with questioned quality, or there is a reason to suspect the information is wrong. Or the information is a likely assumption based on other evidence.
ApparentlyThe information is doubtful and poorly documented, but still most likely correct.
PerhapsThe information might be correct or it might be wrong. It is not supported by any trustworthy sources.
DisprovedThe information is proven to be wrong.