Robert of Sutherland (-1442), 6. Earl of Sutherland

Same as
Additional names
Parents
Father:1William Sutherland (-before 1389), 5. Earl of Sutherland
Mother:2Joanna Menteith (-)
Spouses and relationship events
Married:3Margaret Stewart (-)
Children
Children with Margaret Stewart:
John Sutherland (-1460), 7. Earl of Sutherland4
Attributes
Occupation:56. Earl of Sutherland
Events
Died:61442
He is said to have died in 1442, though he may have deceased before 1427, when the 'Earl of Sutherland' went to England in place of the eldest son of the Earl of March, and it is probable it was his son who went.
Personal Info
He was Earl in 1389, and contrary to Sir Robert Gordon's account, who makes John succeed to his father William and a mythical Earl Nicholas to John, followed by Robert, the latter was really the son of William and his successor. His accession in or before 1389 is proved by his presence as Earl at the pronouncing of the decree against Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan, by the Bishops of Moray and Ross, on 2 November 1389. It is possible that he was Earl in or soon after 1370, and that it is he who figures in the pages of Froissart as taking part in the welcome to the Prench knights in 1384 and to Sir John de Vienne and his company in the following year. But he is not named among those nobles who received shares of the 40,000 gold francs sent from Prance. The Earl of Sutherland also, according to Froissart, was a leader in the Scottish force which invaded the west of England in 1388. On 2 November 1389, he was, as already stated, a witness to the consistorial decree pronounced against Alexander, Earl of Buchan, and he was also named by the Earl as one of his sureties for fulfilment of the decree. He was then, or became soon after, the Earl's son-in-law. On 22 January 1400-1 he granted to his brother Kenneth the lands of Drummoy, and others, with certain conditions as to services to the neighbouring mills and as to fishings.' This writ contains the earliest reference to the castle of Dunrohin, where it is said to be granted, and it was probably used as a residence by Earl Robert; and it may have been he from whom it took its name, though a building may have stood on the site from a very early period. The later history of Earl Robert was apparently uneventful.7
Issues

Sources

1 ´╗┐Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume VIII: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1911), Sutherland, p. 325-29, V William.
2 Ibid
3 Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume II: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1905), Buchan, p. 262-63, Alexander Stewart.
4 Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, The Scots Peerage Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume VIII: (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1911), Sutherland, p. 329-30, VI Robert.
5 Ibid
6 Ibid
7 Ibid
CertainlyThe information is supported by primary sources.
ProbablyThe information is supported by secondary sources which is most likely based on primary sources.
PossiblyIt is unclear if the secondary source cited is based on primary sources, or the information is an assumption well supported by other evidence.
LikelyThe information is only found in secondary sources with questioned quality, or there is a reason to suspect the information is wrong. Or the information is a likely assumption based on other evidence.
ApparentlyThe information is doubtful and poorly documented, but still most likely correct.
PerhapsThe information might be correct or it might be wrong. It is not supported by any trustworthy sources.
DisprovedThe information is proven to be wrong.